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lundi 7 novembre 2016

The Lancet’s Series on Health, Equity and Women’s Cancers (released on Wednesday, November 2nd 2016) - number of women diagnosed with breast cancer alone could almost double to 3.2 million a year by 2030 from 1.7 million in 2015.



The Lancet’s Series on Health, Equity and Women’s Cancers (released on Wednesday, November 2nd  2016) - number of women diagnosed with breast cancer alone could almost double to 3.2 million a year by 2030 from 1.7 million in 2015.

Let’s support the Fight Against Cancer . Supported by the project Ronning Against Cancer, Super Professeur , Marina Nival, mobile.superprofesseur.com and Les Aventures de Ronald Tintin

The Lancet’s Series on Health, Equity and Women’s Cancers – A report released at the 2016 World Cancer Congress Paris on Wednesday, November 2nd

Breast and cervical cancers receive far less funding, advocacy, and public and political attention in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) than in high-income countries (HICs). Yet women in these settings have higher burdens of these diseases, poorer access to care, present with more advanced stages of disease, and are more likely to die from their disease than women in HICs. The Lancet Series, Health, equity, and women’s cancers, explores this neglected global health issue. The papers cover the global burden of breast and cervical cancers and inequities in their incidence, survival, and mortality; interventions that could close the divide between resource-rich countries and LMICs; and the changes to global policy that are needed to deliver safe, equitable, and affordable care for women.

This report , published in the Lancet medical journal on Wednesday, said the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer alone could almost double to 3.2 million a year by 2030 from 1.7 million in 2015.

For cervical cancer, the number of diagnoses could “rise by at least 25% to over 700,000 by 2030”, mainly in low- and middle-income countries, said a statement from the Lancet.

All four of the deadliest cancers – breast, colorectal, lung and cervical cancer – are mostly preventable or can be detected early, when treatment is more successful.

In poorer countries, a much smaller proportion of cancer cases are diagnosed and treated than in rich ones, while a much bigger group dies. The relative burden is growing for developing countries as people live longer due to better basic healthcare.

The Lancet report, comprised of three research papers, said a basic cancer control package could be introduced in low- and middle-income countries for as little as US$1.72 (£1.40) per person – the equivalent of just 3% of current health spending in these countries.

Find more information on the Series:

http://www.thelancet.com/series/womens-cancers



Ronald Tintin, Founder of the project Ronning Against Cancer
“ Together, we can get rid of cancer; we are not alone. Together, we are stronger.”
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